A New York Medical Malpractice Lawyer’s Look at the July Effect in August


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8/4/2011
The Pagan Law Firm, P.C.
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July has long been thought to be a bad time to be hospitalized. People have been told to try to stay out of the hospital during the month of July because of the so-called "July Effect." July is the time when new medical school graduates start their residencies in teaching hospitals around the country, but is it really more dangerous to be in the hospital during the month of July than during other months of the year?

A recent article published in the American College of Physicians' Annals of Internal Medicine reviewed 39 studies on the July effect completed over the past two decades. The review found that, yes, July has a higher number of deaths, longer surgeries and longer hospital stays than other times of the year.

What Should You Do If You Get Sick in July?

The article's authors make clear that you should seek medical treatment if you get sick or if you are injured in July. Do not wait until August. However, be aware of the July Effect and be cautious about the resident treating you. If you have any concerns about your care, you have the right to insist on speaking with a supervising doctor.

What Should You Do if You are Hurt by Medical Malpractice in July?

If you are hurt by doctor or hospital negligence in July, or any other month of the year, then it is important to contact a New York medical malpractice attorney at 1-800-PAGAN-911 for a free consultation about your legal rights and potential recovery.

Read More About Residents and Medical Malpractice in Our Free Library Article: Will Shorter Resident Shifts Reduce New York Medical Malpractice Injuries?

Category: Surgical Mistakes


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